About

I cannot recall when, and why exactly I started to follow the path of photography. Or at what moment it became a true passion of mine. As a toddler, I spent many hours nosing through wildlife encyclopedias. I gazed at exhilarating pictures of animals that I had never seen or heard of – animals that lived in lands far away.

As I grew older, I focused more and more wildlife books, and I started to become intrigued by this mysterious force called nature. At some point decided that books were not enough for me – I wanted to know more. For my birthdays I asked for BBC and National Geographic wildlife documentaries. Similarly I started to collect books about nature, specifically about African wildlife and its behavior. The concepts about ecosystems and biomes excited me, or atleast the parts that a young child could understand.

At the age of six I visited Africa for the first time – Zambia. I was amazed. For the first time I saw the plains of Africa that my books had told me about. I saw animals roaming across the savanna. I felt at home! It was during this very same trip, that I held a camera for the first time. I was fascinated about how I could permanently capture a frame in time, just by pressing a single button. From that moment onwards, photography became a regular thing for me to do. Over many years I started taking pictures with the right composition and a good use of light. I could sit for hours waiting for the perfect shot. I would look around, admire the tranquil nature around me, and enjoy its beauty with my eyes and through my lens.

I am now close to finishing school. In a few months I am embarking on a trip from Amsterdam to Maputo. This will be the start of my career as a travel photographer. It is no secret anymore that nature on our planet needs to be preserved, but why would one want to put so much effort into a land that can only be accessed by expensive flights and costly hotels? It seems logical that one would only truly care about nature when one truly experiences it. Photography provides an insight on that far away land – whether it’s the African Savannah or the Amazon Jungle, photography shows the world what the world needs to see. Our planet is round so that it can be travelled around infinitely: So see the sights that might not stay much longer, and try to prevent it from happening.